Modeling Phononic Band Gap Materials and Structures

Nagi Elabbasi | February 10, 2016

Today, guest blogger and Certified Consultant Nagi Elabbasi of Veryst Engineering shares simulation research designed to optimize band gaps for phononic crystals. Phononic crystals are rather unique materials that can be engineered with a particular band gap. As the demand for these materials continues to grow, so does the interest in simulating them, specifically to optimize their band gaps. COMSOL Multiphysics, as we’ll show you here, can be used to perform such studies.

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Nagi Elabbasi | August 8, 2014

Today, we invite guest blogger Nagi Elabbasi of Veryst Engineering to share the work they performed on simulating wear in COMSOL Multiphysics. Using COMSOL Multiphysics, we implemented a wear model and validated it by simulating a pin-on-disc wear test. We then used the model to predict wear in an automotive disc brake problem. The results we found showed good agreement with published wear data.

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Nagi Elabbasi | September 6, 2013

Today we have the pleasure of welcoming Nagi Elabbasi of Veryst Engineering as a guest blogger. Read on to see what this COMSOL Certified Consultant has to say about fluid-structure interaction. Two weeks ago I led a webinar on fluid-structure interaction (FSI) using COMSOL Multiphysics. FSI involves coupling between a deformable or moving structure and a surrounding or internal fluid flow. There is a growing number of engineering and scientific problems where a purely structural or purely CFD analysis just […]

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Nagi Elabbasi | April 22, 2014

Today, we invite guest blogger Nagi Elabbasi of Veryst Engineering to share a modeling example of immersed beams. When thin structures such as beams, plates, or shells are immersed in a fluid, their natural frequencies are reduced. The fluid also affects their mode shapes and is a source of damping. This phenomenon affects structures across a wide range of industries and sizes, from micro-scale structures (e.g. MEMS actuators) to larger structures (e.g. ships).

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